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Same-Sex Couple Ulises Garcia And Craig Berry Among First To Marry Ahead Of High Court Decision

Ulises Garcia and Craig Berry say they will get married as many times as necessary for their union to be formally recognised at a national level.

The same-sex couple were one of many who chose to get married in Canberra today, on the first day possible under the ACT’s Marriage Equality Bill.

“Every opportunity to celebrate our love for each other, we’ll take it,” Mr Berry said.

“Even if [the High Court] throws it out and we have to do it again, we’ll be happy to do it over and over – as many times as it takes.

“This is our second time. We had a civil partnership two years ago and this is now our wedding.”

Forty-six couples had registered in order to be able to wed this weekend ahead of a decision on Thursday on whether the ACT’s same-sex marriage law is valid.

“We know that it might only be short-lived, but even so, we’re happy to share it with our friends and family,” Mr Berry said.

“No matter the label that’s put on it, the love that we have for each other is just amazing.

“But we’re very happy this opportunity has finally come along for us.”

During his vows, Mr Berry expressed his excitement to get married under Territory law.

“It is wonderful I can express my love for you today by entering into this marriage,” he said.

“However, no matter what it is called, no matter what the judges or the politicians say, my love for you is strong and unwavering.

“Indeed, even saying we are married is not enough to express how much I love you.

“I do not have words, there are no words, the best I have is ‘I love you’.”

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Mr Berry says he and Mr Garcia have received a huge amount of support from family, friends and work colleagues.

“All of my work colleagues, as soon it was announced we could get married, gave a cheer at my workplace,” he said.

“We’ve had so many people congratulating us and say how wonderful it is that we can have this today.”

Australian Marriage Equality’s Rodney Croome says just 15 years ago he was considered a criminal for his homosexuality.

“What struck me… as I was watching today’s wedding and participating in it, is that as extraordinary as it was, it is also and more importantly, very, very ordinary,” he said.

“In years to come, people will look back and say ‘What a historic moment that was’, but also ‘Why did it take us so long to recognise the wonderful ordinariness of the love and commitment in same-sex relationships?’”

Mr Croome called on Prime Minister Tony Abbott to let his MPs decide whether or not same-sex marriage should be legalised at a federal level.

“I believe that a majority of Coalition members support a conscience vote and when that conscience vote is granted that will remove the final obstacle and this reform will have a fighting chance.”

Author: Elise Pianegonda
Publication: ABC News
Date: 7 December 2013
Read original artilce here